Discourser.Online

Features Overview

Discourser.Online was born from Award Winning Communications teams and global documentarians based in Barcelona. We specialise in NFP consultancy and have finalled in Human Rights Awards in Australia and Europe. We have partnered with news agencies in Madrid to share stories with global impacts, we are skilled at operating in high conflict zones and bought stories home. We provide 360 Communications and Translations services. If you would like to partner up with us, drop us a line. Following are some samples of our writing style from previous Campaigns, Current Affairs and NFP storytelling.

 Interview by Alison Wilson. Photo: Bruce Djite of Adelaide United celebrates after scoring a goal during the round 16 A-League match between Adelaide United and Newcastle Jets at Coopers Stadium on 24 January 2015 in Adelaide. Photo by Daniel Kalisz/Getty Images.

Interview by Alison Wilson. Photo: Bruce Djite of Adelaide United celebrates after scoring a goal during the round 16 A-League match between Adelaide United and Newcastle Jets at Coopers Stadium on 24 January 2015 in Adelaide. Photo by Daniel Kalisz/Getty Images.

BRUCE DJITE (THIS ARTICLE WAS PRODUCED FOR A CAMPAIGN ON DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE FOR AUSTRALIA'S PEAK BODY ON RACISM)

Bruce, who lives in Adelaide with his young family, has also played soccer in Turkey and China. He currently plays striker for A League football club Adelaide United. He was born in Washington D.C and emigrated with his family in 1990 as a young child. His father, formerly a lecturer at Georgetown University, moved to accept an academic position at Sydney University.

“Growing up in Australia from such a young age, the Australian environment has shaped my cultural expectations to a certain degree.”

I think they have a different awareness of racism in China or Turkey. There is a lot more social stratification in those countries – more than what we have in Australia – and it doesn’t feel as intentional there or maybe they haven’t had the education about it like we have here.

That is the problem here. People know better but they still continue to do so…to be racist and make racist remarks. We obviously don’t have the same problems as the U.S where recently and throughout their history black people have been shot and killed by law enforcement. However, the problem here is that whilst people know better, they continue to act in this disgusting manner.”

Bruce is insightful, passionate and very easy to talk to – he is not afraid to speak out. With regard to the booing of Adam Goodes during the 2015 AFL season, Bruce says:

It is just wrong, wrong, wrong. We know what he has endured. It is not just the boo-ing, it is the abuse that comes with it. People have been asked to stop. They know it is causing harm but they keep on going. I had a few players contact me. We spoke about whether we should get together and do something about it because they know I am an Ambassador for All Together Now. I am across a few different sports, mostly soccer but I know a few AFL players too.”

On how racism in sport can be effectively addressed and whether a top-down approach would be sufficient, he believes that “if the message is delivered by players it has far greater reach and impact than if it came from some guys in suits at any induction. There should be greater education and understanding so no-one has to endure what Adam Goodes has. It is important such education is delivered from the top down too.”

“A two-year-old drawing on you or the walls, they don’t know better. But if an eight -year-old is still doing it, they are choosing to. It is exactly the same with racism. You choose.”

Interview by Alison Wilson. Photo: Bruce Djite of Adelaide United celebrates after scoring a goal during the round 16 A-League match between Adelaide United and Newcastle Jets at Coopers Stadium on 24 January 2015 in Adelaide. Photo by Daniel Kalisz/Getty Images.

 Menik Gooneratne photo supplied by the actress

Menik Gooneratne photo supplied by the actress

written for the working with diversity campaign

Menik became known for portraying Priya Kapoor in Neighbours. After speaking with Menik for a few minutes, it becomes clear that she is not just gorgeous but clever. She is commercially, socially and politically knowledgeable, balancing motherhood with a career which includes being an ambassador for several social justice groups. 

Menik doesn’t blame anyone for her departure from Neighbours. Despite a heated racial and political fall out in the global media, Menik doesn’t see it as anything malicious. Rather as the result of a change in producers with varying priorities.

Menik is very pointed to let me know that she was on the show for around 18 months and her character had ‘done it’s time’. But the media were vicious about ‘brown people taking Australian jobs’. Menik knew the negativity was from a vocal minority but the hurt was inevitable.

Menik moved on from the Australian soap opera proving ground and onto larger productions, a soon to be released film Lion starring Nicole Kidman in which Menik has a leading role. She is another woman creating her own opportunities and gambling every last cent on her own project telling stories about her community. The Sapphires comes to mind both due to its success and real life story,

”Yes, the Sapphires is a great example, they took a chance making it and it was such a success. We need more ethnic writers, more ‘brown’ people on TV, great production companies and we have the content ready to share – that is relatable and without stereotypes”. Typically, when Menik pitched her ‘unable to be disclosed’ idea in Australia, she was directed to SBS, not wanting to hide from the mainstream she took her idea abroad and it was embraced - so again it is a case of watch this space.

“There are many Aussie stories we haven’t seen about our communities and a cultural shift won’t happen overnight but at least we know it is stirring.”

 Pearl Tan (Right), Bali Padda (Left). Pearl is a lecturer NIDA/AFTRS, producer and Chair of the Equity Diversity Committee.

Pearl Tan (Right), Bali Padda (Left). Pearl is a lecturer NIDA/AFTRS, producer and Chair of the Equity Diversity Committee.

written for the working with diversity campaign, Addressing racism in australian film & Tv